Japanese court rejects Syrians’ asylum bids

Japan is one of the few countries in the world steadfastly attempting to maintain its “cultural and ethnic homogeneity” in the face of mounting pressure to open its borders.

See my posts over the years as western mainstream media, the United Nations, and international communists and open borders agitators regularly criticize Japan’s wish to save itself (just as they are now doing the same to Hungary and Poland).

Have you noticed that there are no Islamic terror attacks in Japan?

 

japanese people and culture

Japan for the Japanese…..

 

From Reuters at USNews:

TOKYO (Reuters) – Two Syrian asylum seekers on Tuesday lost a bid to overturn a government decision to deny them refugee status, in the first such lawsuit in Japan since civil war erupted in the Middle Eastern state in 2011.

The Tokyo District Court upheld a government ruling made five years ago, that the pair’s bid for asylum was not admissible under international refugee law.

“The world understands the Syrian situation – it’s getting worse. But the Japanese court hasn’t understood that at all,” one of the plaintiffs, Joude Youssef, told a news conference.  [The nerve! So Middle Eastern countries can’t stop fighting among themselves and that is Japan’s problem!—ed]

Speaking in Arabic through a Japanese interpreter, Youssef said he planned to appeal the court’s decision.

The second asylum seeker was not at the news conference.

Lawyers said Youssef had the right to stay in Japan, under a humanitarian status that allows residency but not full refugee rights. It was not clear if the second plaintiff would appeal.

Notice how the Reuters reporter can’t help but throw in this next bit about worker shortages and an aging population implying that the Japanese are stupid and should be inviting in the third world workers (who would of course change Japan forever!).

Immigration and asylum are sensitive subjects in Japan, where many pride themselves on cultural and ethnic homogeneity even amid a shrinking population and the worst labor shortage since the 1970s.

Youssef, a Kurd from the north of Syria, had applied for asylum in Japan in 2012, after saying he was persecuted for organizing pro-democracy demonstrations.

The Japanese government rejected the claim a year later, saying he lacked proof of his involvement in protests in Syria. 

The second plaintiff had claimed asylum after refusing military service in Syria. [Think about this, because he refused military service in Syria he expects Japan to take care of him!—ed]

Although a major donor to international aid organizations, Japan has remained reluctant to take in refugees.

It accepted only 20 last year, with a record 19,628 people applying for asylum.

Japan, hang in there!


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