Syrian refugee in Canada claims discrimination in drivers’ license case

Oh geez, so here we have one of the tens of thousands of Syrians admitted to Canada since Prime Minister Justin Trudeau began his airlift (46,000 arrived in 2016 alone) whining and complaining because he can’t prove he was a good driver in Syria.

From Around Canada:

When Yaser Nadaf fled the horrors of war-torn Syria, the last thing he was thinking about was his driver’s licence.

yaser-nadaf

Nadaf is taking his case to the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal so he can get his drivers license sooner.  Wouldn’t the citizens of Canada be safer if he went through their licensing program? Photo: //www.atinitonews.com/2017/12/syrian-refugees-claim-that-ontario-road-test-wait-time-is-discriminatory-gathers-steam/

It was only months later, when he arrived in Canada after a brief stay in Turkey, that he realized it wasn’t with him and that without it, he would have to start from the very beginning of Ontario’s licensing process, unable to get his G2 licence for at least eight months.

Luckily, Nadaf remembered exactly where he’d left it and his sister, who was still in their home country, located it for him.  [So obviously his sister isn’t fearing for her life and running to Canada—ed]

Another document is required in Ontario to back up the driver’s license, but such documents are not available from Syrian local governments.

By the way, this points to the FACT that Syrians cannot be thoroughly screened because documents about their past are NOT available!

The Ministry of Transportation provides an exemption to the waiting period for previous driving experience outside of Canada, but only if an applicant provides an original letter of authentication attesting to their experience. Ontario is the only province that requires that sort documentation to exempt someone from having to wait between getting their interim and permanent licence.

[….]

The trouble for Nadaf and many other Syrian newcomers is that documents like that are usually acquired from the local jurisdiction that issued the licence — something many refugees simply don’t have access to with many fleeing from the very governments they’re now asked to turn to for documentation, explains refugee advocate Omar Khan.

Boo hoo! Then start at the beginning!

It was only after Yaser Nadaf fled Syria that he realized he didn’t have his licence and without it, he would need to start from the very beginning of Ontario’s licensing process. (Submitted by Yaser Nadaf)

And it’s that requirement that has one Syrian refugee taking his case to the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal — now with the help of the International Human Rights Program (IHRP) at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Law.

You see how this goes—welcome them and they want to bend the laws in their favor the minute they get into the West!

My Canada category is growing by leaps and bounds, see here.



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